Reading the Book of Zephaniah and remembering a day of desolation and devastation in association with a utopian day to come.
by Prof. Ehud Ben Zvi
“Great as the Sea is Your Breaking” (Lamentations 2:13)
by Dr. Tzvi Novick
Is halacha still binding if one accepts biblical criticism? Can Torah be both divine and human at the same time?
A Symposium
Expanding upon R. David Zvi Hoffmann’s insight.
by Dr. Rabbi Zev Farber
When and why washing became immersion: between traditional-rabbinic and scientific-critical approaches to the origin of immersion and the mikveh.

by Dr. Yonatan Adler
Biblical scholarship has deepened our understanding of the Torah and at the same time challenges us to consider the implications of our declaring the Torah to be emet. What is emet and what does it mean to say that the Torah is emet?
A Symposium
Morally problematic halachot remain on the books despite rabbinic attempts to transform or reinterpret them. How do we relate to these texts as Torah from Sinai, coming from God?
by Dr. Rabbi Norman Solomon
The study of biblical criticism cuts to the very meaning of the value system of Modern Orthodoxy, i.e. forging a distinctive synthesis of modern culture with traditional values.
Dr. Steven Bayme
Toward a Sociology of Knowledge Analysis of TheTorah.com
by Chaim I. Waxman
An Exploration of the Views of Sa’adia Gaon, Judah Halevi, Ibn Ezra, and Maimonides
by Prof. Haim (Howard) Kreisel
“Happy is the one who seizes and dashes your babies against a rock!”(v. 9). Question: How are we supposed to read such a verse nowadays?
by 13 Respondents

by Rabbi Zev Farber Ph.D.
Four Answers to one question
by Dr. Baruch J. Schwartz

 

Fifty Years Ago—A Flashback
by Dr. Rabbi Lawrence Grossman
A Conceptual Foundation for Wrestling with Biblical Scholarship
by Rabbi David Bigman
Reflections on the Importance of Asking the Right Question
by Prof. Tamar Ross