Josephus in his Antiquities of the Jews, tells the story of Queen Helena of Adiabene and her sons Kings Izates II and Monobazus II, and how they converted to Judaism in the mid-first century C.E. Rabbinic literature preserves several anecdotes about this family. However, the rabbis knew little about them, and grappled with their insider/outsider status.
by Dr. Malka Simkovich
In the Persian period, the Torah, which is made up of various law collections, was ascribed to Moses as revealed by YHWH. A parallel development was taking place in Achaemenid Persia that sheds light on this process: The sacred texts called the Avesta, that contain the law​​ (dāta) and tradition (daēnā) of Zoroastrianism​, were being collectively ascribed to Zarathustra (Zoroaster) as revealed by Ahuramazdā.
by Dr. Yishai Kiel
Traditional commentators endued certain Torah references with midrashic or esoteric purport in an effort to counteract those who mocked them. But in so doing, they were conceding the mockers’ evaluation of these texts as being, prima facie, inconsequential.
by Dr. Hacham Isaac Sassoon
The Rabbis read the Song of Songs as an allegory of the relationship between God and the Jewish people. Only in the Middle Ages, in Spain and Northern France, did scholars begin to pay attention to the plain (Peshat) meaning of the text.
by Dr. Barry Dov Walfish
Exodus spends seven chapters laying the command to the Israelites to build the Tabernacle, and then another six chapters detailing its fulfillment, totaling more than one quarter of the book​.

Responses by: Rabbi Herzl Hefter & Prof. Baruch Schwartz
Biblical scholarship has deepened our understanding of the Torah and at the same time challenges us to consider the implications of our declaring the Torah to be emet. What is emet and what does it mean to say that the Torah is emet?
A Symposium
Morally problematic halachot remain on the books despite rabbinic attempts to transform or reinterpret them. How do we relate to these texts as Torah from Sinai, coming from God?
by Dr. Rabbi Norman Solomon
The study of biblical criticism cuts to the very meaning of the value system of Modern Orthodoxy, i.e. forging a distinctive synthesis of modern culture with traditional values.
Dr. Steven Bayme
Around the turn of the era, the consonantal (proto-)MT text was accepted as an authoritative form of Hebrew Scripture by the proto-rabbinic movement, whereas other forms were accepted as authoritative by other groups.
by Prof. Emanuel Tov
Is halacha still binding if one accepts biblical criticism? Can Torah be both divine and human at the same time?
A Symposium
“Happy is the one who seizes and dashes your babies against a rock!”(v. 9). Question: How are we supposed to read such a verse nowadays?
by 13 Respondents
Jewish and Christian tradition ascribes authorship of the Pentateuch to Moses in the 13th century B.C.E. Is this what the Pentateuch itself implies about who wrote it and when?
by Prof. Christopher Rollston
Four Answers to one question
by Dr. Baruch J. Schwartz

 

Fifty Years Ago—A Flashback
by Dr. Rabbi Lawrence Grossman
A Conceptual Foundation for Wrestling with Biblical Scholarship
by Rabbi David Bigman
Reflections on the Importance of Asking the Right Question
by Prof. Tamar Ross